Comment and analysis on all things CharlotteRSS

Tuesday, August, 4 2015

I-77 Lawsuit: Toll Deal Unconstitutional

Don Carrington, executive editor of Carolina Journal, has an article out on the I-77 toll dispute. Because of the local impact, here’s the full text of it: RALEIGH — Even though Gov. Pat McCrory has said the tolling project along the Interstate 77 corridor north of Charlotte will go forward, it faces a challenge to […]

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Of baseball and hoagies

Or heroes. OK, this is a bit old, but the New York Times reports there’s a close association between what National League East baseball team you root for and whether you call a long sandwich a “hoagie” or a “sub” or “hero.” Hoagie is a Philadelphia term, and as you head towards New York, sub […]

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Meanwhile in Greensboro…

This is one of the odder things I’ve come across in 25 years doing public policy work: The General Assembly felt the need to change the composition of Greensboro City Council and the powers of Greensboro’s mayor. This was an extremely controversial move, especially as all this was suppose to happen without giving the city’s […]

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Asheville’s economy

Asheville is generally regarded as a hip city, with an active local music scene and lots of local breweries. It’s the sort of place that if you believe in the Creative Class construct, would seem should have an extremely vibrant economy, beyond being just a tourist mecca. That really isn’t the case though. From the […]

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Are e-cig sales plateauing?

A Wells-Fargo analyst thinks so. From the Winston-Salem Journal: A leading tobacco analyst said Monday there is increasing evidence that adult consumers may be tapering off their initial enthusiasm for electronic cigarettes, which could limit their potential for benefiting public health. Bonnie Herzog, with Wells Fargo Securities, said her second-quarter retailer survey found “moderating vapor […]

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Charlotte's Greatest Hits

Black got sweetheart deal

As jailed former state House Speaker Jim Black mounts a campaign for early release, critics contend that the state justice system did favors for Black regarding the settlement of his $1 million fine.

Questions about Black settlement

Wake County officials say imprisoned former House Speaker Jim Black satisfied a $1 million fine by surrendering some Mecklenburg County real estate, but questions remain about the real market value of the property.

Black settlement may not add up

Imprisoned former House Speaker Jim Black used undeveloped land with a tax value of less than $150,000 to pay off an outstanding $500,000 state fine.

Fat CATS

Colleen Calvani writes that the Charlotte Area Transit system will scale back some routes in an attempt to counter three major decreases in funding.

McCrory’s failure

Jeff Taylor argues that Pat McCrory failed to carry Mecklenburg County because he failed to move its conservatives.

Lynx And Exploding Pipes

Jeff Taylor says there may be another factor to blame for CMUD’s recent series of water leaks.

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Research

An Alternative Budget: Response to the governor's proposed budget for the upcoming biennium

The John Locke Foundation is continuing its tradition, started in 1995, of offering an alternative to the governor’s budget recommendation. Consistent with prior years, this JLF budget focuses on core government. This budget spends less in both years of the biennium than the governor’s, and only increases spending by 2 percent from the last fiscal year.

By The Numbers: What Government Costs in North Carolina Cities and Counties FY 2012

The economic recession that hit full force in 2008 was declared officially over in June 2009 when the country experienced two quarters of very slow growth. But a troubled housing sector and a still-sluggish economy with high unemployment have contributed to the fiscal crises facing many cities and counties in North Carolina. As always, this edition of By the Numbers is must reading for government officials and taxpayers alike. It highlights what kinds of fiscal problems face local governments in an economy that grows only very slowly. With the facts given here, county commissioners and city council members can easily compare their area’s tax burden to similarly situated cities or counties. For taxpayers, BTN is a starting point for questions about taxes and spending, enabling them to hold their elected and appointed officials accountable.

Agenda 2014: A Candidate's Guide to Key Issues in North Carolina Public Policy

Every two years since 1996, coinciding with North Carolina's races for the General Assembly, the John Locke Foundation has published a revised edition of Agenda, our public policy guide for candidates and voters. Typically as we enter the campaign season, candidates for public office in North Carolina are faced with a daunting task: to develop informed positions on dozens of public policy issues. In the pages of Agenda 2014 we provide a concise and easily digestible guide covering a wide range of specific issues, from taxes and spending to energy policy and education.

City and County Issue Guide 2014

Policymakers in the many local governments of North Carolina face a host of important challenges. This issue guide offers solutions to problems that confront North Carolinians at municipal and county levels. The common thread in these recommendations is freedom. By increasing individual freedom, local governments can foster the prosperity of all North Carolinians and keep open avenues to innovative solutions from enterprising citizens.

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